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Posted by: behindcurtain ( )
Date: January 04, 2021 01:07AM

How do you explain the fact that my mom, dad, and siblings are all believing Mormons, and that they don't listen to me when I try to tell them why I don't believe? It's surreal. It's like I was purposely born into this situation because I did something in a past life to deserve it.

Maybe if you harm people in a certain way, you are born again as the same type of person you harmed in your previous life, because you need to learn a lesson. You need to know how others feel when you hurt them in a certain way, like persecuting them for their religion.

Maybe I persecuted people of another religion in a past life. Maybe the lesson I need to learn is not to persecute people of ANY religion, not just Mormonism.

Or maybe I did nothing wrong to deserve this, and instead I chose my present circumstances in order to grow in some way.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/04/2021 01:11AM by behindcurtain.

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Posted by: Brother Of Jerry ( )
Date: January 04, 2021 01:51AM

Sounds more like you checked off the Mormon merit badge and have moved on to the next higher level, and the rest of them got held back.

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Posted by: summer ( )
Date: January 04, 2021 07:28AM

Eh, I would just stop with, "I don't believe it." No need to explain why.

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Posted by: moremany ( )
Date: January 04, 2021 11:54AM

^


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Posted by: loislane ( )
Date: January 04, 2021 07:51AM

They don't listen to you because they already know they are not going to change.

Agree to disagree. The truth about Mormonism is easier to find than it ever was. If they are interested in finding it, they can find it without you.

Find other stuff to talk about.

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Posted by: moremany ( )
Date: January 04, 2021 11:56AM

loislane Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Find other stuff to talk about. >

Amen

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Posted by: moremany ( )
Date: January 04, 2021 12:02PM

Some people NEVER think for themselves. Others seldom do.

Past lives are one thing.
Present lives are another.
Future lives, still another.

Many are confused as to which life they should be living.

I'd most always recommend the present.

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Posted by: Tevai ( )
Date: January 04, 2021 02:07PM

moremany Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Past lives are one thing.
> Present lives are another.

Not so sure about this. Real life example: rabbis in general are now fairly used to the situation where a non-Jew comes to talk, or to inquire about conversion to Judaism....because they have Holocaust memories. As I have posted here before, there are now (effectively) a number of "go to" rabbis (in areas with larger numbers of Jews) who have become experienced in dealing with this situation, including present-life consequences.

Past life memories of the Holocaust still very much exist in a surprisingly numerous, and extremely disparate, "group" of people--very often currently non-Jews--who, at minimum, are bewildered by what they "remember," and at maximum are unsure if this indicates they are not quite sane.


> Future lives, still another.

I think this is dismissive. I, personally, frequently think of potential future consequences of my present-life actions, and this is a central factor in how I evaluate my present-life actions and intentions.
[EDITED TO ADD: I am aware of a number of real life stories about people who have decided they want to be a musician, an artist, a ballet dancer, a mathematician/scientist/doctor (etc.) in a future life, although they readily admit they lack the required talent or intelligence or whatever in THIS life, who very seriously pursue (in this life) the appropriate studies, etc. so they will have that as a foundation so can fulfill their deepest dreams in a future life.]


> Many are confused as to which life they should be
> living.

Maybe initially (for a few days, weeks, or months). Everyone I know, or know of, who has experienced this has eventually sorted it out emotionally and intellectually. I think the process is something like reading or viewing a vivid historical work (could be a book, a film, whatever) which very deeply affects you in some way....but you gradually come to realize that time (on this planet) is linear, and you develop the ability to sort of "put it in its place" on the [larger] timeline.


> I'd most always recommend the present.

If someone has memories of them doing something (or somethingS) they would NEVER do "in real [this] life," they need to process these memories "out" until the first emotions (could be horror, could be disbelief, etc.) have been, in effect, "put in their [proper] place."

Depending on what they remember, this may take some time.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 01/04/2021 02:58PM by Tevai.

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Posted by: spiritist ( )
Date: January 04, 2021 04:23PM

I have strong impressions and recollection of a couple past lives and it does impact the way I feel and my 'interest' about certain 'groups of people'.

However, I do not think they would accept that I was 'one of them' in a past life so I have not approached them as hey Bro's I was one of you. I have heard of 'others' that have approached some groups with their past lives and they were totally 'unimpressed' and many outright upset!

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Posted by: Tevai ( )
Date: January 04, 2021 05:26PM

spiritist Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I have strong impressions and recollection of a
> couple past lives and it does impact the way I
> feel and my 'interest' about certain 'groups of
> people'.

Yup.


> However, I do not think they would accept that I
> was 'one of them' in a past life so I have not
> approached them as hey Bro's I was one of you. I
> have heard of 'others' that have approached some
> groups with their past lives and they were totally
> 'unimpressed' and many outright upset!

I don't want to inadvertently leave a false impression. The "official" end of the Holocaust is May 8, 1945, which is (this year) 76 years ago.

Within Judaism, it took at least three decades (certainly all of the the time before the 1980s) for there to be at least a fledgling realization that those scattered individuals--who eventually made their way into shuls or Jewish institutions of higher learning, extremely hesitantly saying they had memories of the Holocaust--to be taken seriously.

Part of this was that, from the post-WWII years forward, there began a hesitating trickle, of what would eventually become a strong and widespread interest in, and an acceptance of, the more advanced teachings of the "historical bundle" we now refer to, in shorthand terms, as Kabbalah (studies which began during the Middle Ages).

Beginning in the Middle Ages, there had been internal Jewish prohibitions against Jews studying Kabbalah unless:
1) they were male....plus:
2) they were married (this was a necessity)....plus:
3) they had children (another near necessity unless there was some kind of apparent physiological/anatomical reason why children were impossible).

Some very intelligent women did study Kabbalah on the down low, but technically this was prohibited.

The reason for these prohibitions was that, starting from at least the Middle Ages, Jews feared studying Kabbalah would be so spiritually/intellectually intoxicating that such students would inadvertently go insane.

If a potential male student of Kabbalah was married (which meant he had sexual obligations towards his wife that she could legally assert in a Jewish court if necessary), and had children running around their typically one- or two-room houses, a student HAD to stay firmly anchored in three-dimensional reality just in order to live daily life.

After the end of WWII gigantic change began to occur within American culture, and in many other global areas (Europe, the Middle East, etc.), and these overarching, more global, cultural changes affected Judaism in many different ways. (The growing "push" for the accepted institution of female rabbis, and for females to have access to the same level of education as males took for granted, as examples.)

As what we now term "New Age" began to affect American life (in particular), it turned out that a critical mass of the total content of Kabbalah was also included in non-Jewish "New Age" teachings....which led to general (non-Jewish AND Jewish) acceptance of ideas and principles and theories and studies which would have been (and, in fact, HAD been) considered ridiculous/nutso when they had first generally appeared in the period leading up to the "Roaring Twenties." (The introduction of, and the general cultural acceptance of, seances would be a pretty good marker, I think, of when the study of Kabbalah began growing outside of Judaism as well as inside it.)

I know there were at least some people who had Holocaust memories who went to talk to rabbis in the 1950s, and I think it is probably fair to postulate that they were courteously received by the rabbis, at the same moment as they were--in effect--as gently as possible ushered out of the door.

By the 1980s, those same people were being treated as if, just possibly, those memories MIGHT be more accurate than not. Informal studies were being done to try to "test" the accuracy of some of the memories. (One of my colleagues--also a convert to Judaism--in our local Jewish Speakers Bureau had vivid, very detailed, memories of the inside of the gassing van she was in as she, and her family and her community, were in the active process of being killed, as the van drove from their town to the designated burial place for their bodies.)

As the twenty-first century appeared on the horizon, a fairly general acceptance has evolved among a large sector of Judaism that "Holocaust memories" (which are generally extremely detailed, as well as emotional) are possibly, maybe probably, more true than not.

Right now, "today," if a rabbi feels him/herself inadequate to address Holocaust memory issues, they generally know (or know "of") another rabbi who has acquired expertise in the Holocaust field, and is familiar with the personal accounts, who can help.

And it took only seventy-six years to get here!!



Edited 6 time(s). Last edit at 01/04/2021 06:38PM by Tevai.

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Posted by: bradley ( )
Date: January 04, 2021 06:01PM

Although it kinda sucks right now to be a Mormon, I think the 21st Century will be a wonderful time to be a Jew. The reason for this is that with the new Earth energy, nature will give up her esoteric secrets that Judaism has dug at for so long. That vindication will bring a new popularity and prestige.

I don’t think they’ll be converting to Mormonism on bended knee. Mormonism was designed to separate a fool from his money.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 01/04/2021 06:05PM by bradley.

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Posted by: bradley ( )
Date: January 04, 2021 03:40PM

Either way it seems like some enlightened thinking, especially if you arrived there on your own. So you have no business being Mormon.

You can’t fix cult brainwashing. The Mormon church is so wealthy because its psychological manipulation is more effective than most cults. To me, that makes it dangerous.

Just because you broke your chains doesn’t mean you can break theirs.

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